medicalschool:

Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and arteriosclerosis

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

startswithabang:

The Stars Beyond

"Each galaxy has a story. Some are small but growing rapidly. Others look bland but betray a complex, vibrant past. What’s more, most large galaxies — again like some cities — appear to be built upon the ruins of smaller, more ancient ones. Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is not unlike Rome in this respect. Ancient stellar remains show up viscerally in the the faint, extended outer reaches of galaxies — regions of light so diffuse that they’ve been difficult to study until recently."

You’ve no doubt heard of dark matter halos around galaxies: vast, extended, spherical collection of mass that reach for hundreds of thousands of light-years beyond what we typically think of as a spiral or elliptical galaxy. But did you know that galaxies contain vast, extended stellar halos as well? Moreover, they look nothing like you’d expect! They’re not spherical or even ellipsoidal, but highly irregular, and have an awful lot to teach us about how galaxies came to be the way they are today. Galaxy evolution expert James Bullock has the story.

(Reblogged from infinity-imagined)
backspatter:

Woman with severe osteomalacia - Osteomalacia is the softening of the bones caused by defective bone mineralization secondary to inadequate amounts of available phosphorus and calcium, or because of overactive resorption of calcium from the bone as a result of hyperparathyroidism.

backspatter:

Woman with severe osteomalacia - Osteomalacia is the softening of the bones caused by defective bone mineralization secondary to inadequate amounts of available phosphorus and calcium, or because of overactive resorption of calcium from the bone as a result of hyperparathyroidism.

(Reblogged from uaortho)
The standard treatments for cancer are not meant to heal, but to destroy.
(Reblogged from medicalschool)

medicalschool:

Histology of the Ovary - antral follicle

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

medicalschool:

On September 15-16, 2012, a team of gynecological surgeons from the University of Gothenburg performed the world’s first mother-to daughter uterus transplantation, when two Swedish women received new wombs donated by their mothers. According to their release, the surgery resulted in no complications, and the donating mothers are up and walking. The first patient had her uterus removed in 1998 because of surgery for cervical cancer, while the second patient was born without a uterus. Prior to the procedure, each woman, both of whom are in their 30s, underwent IVF-treatments. So, assuming the procedure worked, these women might someday be able to give birth using the wombs in which they themselves were carried in.

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

nevver:

Staring at the Sun, [to scale]

(Reblogged from infinity-imagined)

medicalschool:

Cardiovascular System Development - Heart Tube Segments

As the tubular heart grows it develops dilations and constrictions which form the truncus arteriosus, bulbus cordis, primitive ventricle, primitive atrium and sinus venosus.

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

About 1,500 people, including 350 children, are using this UN school in Beit Hanoun as a displaced persons camp. The camp has poor hygiene, no electricity, nor running water. On average, 50 people share one room. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza. There, “…whole streets are no more than piles of rubble,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

(Reblogged from doctorswithoutborders)

medicalschool:

Dorsal View of the Heart and Lungs

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

mediclopedia:

My days have been a big blur.. With school, hospital work and research, I haven’t had a weekend to myself. 

I love reading PhD comics (is there such thing as a MD comic??) and most of it is all fun and games, but this one was extra interesting. 

I love the research I am doing and its fascinating, but I can’t help think “what’s the point” pretty often. One of the thing that worries me the most as I read more papers is the quality of research. I definitely think this is driven by the competitive nature of graduate school and the job search and the need to have publications out, but it definitely slows down research as a whole now that we have so much to filter out. 

I hope to continue my research as I start medical school in the future… but I will keep all this in mind as I do, and work with the same zeal I started with to produce quality work.

Anyway, I am rambling on because I am so tired… I will update next time with a fresh mind and some exciting stories!

(Reblogged from mediclopedia)

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Yann Libessart/MSF

“Residents have written on banners or sections of walls that are still standing. ‘Here I had an ice cream shop,’ ‘Here I had a car garage’, ‘If you want to help, call…’ In Haiti after the earthquake, I saw the same level of destruction, except here it is not because of a natural disaster,” said Michele Beck, MSF medical team leader. Beit Hanoun is one of the neighborhoods most affected by the bombings in northern Gaza.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

(Reblogged from doctorswithoutborders)

explore-blog:

Marie Curie on curiosity, wonder, and the spirit of adventure in science – a wonderful remembrance by her daughter.

(Reblogged from science-junkie)

guardian:

Which countries are responsible for climate change?

Country sizes show the eventual CO₂ emissions from oil, coal and gas extracted each year. Many of these fuels are exported rather than used domestically, but arguably the countries extracting and selling fossil fuels bear a degree of responsibility for the resulting emissions.

See who is most vulnerable to global warming’s impacts »

(Reblogged from guardian)
medicalschool:

Development of the human brain

medicalschool:

Development of the human brain

(Reblogged from medicalschool)