mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament
via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

mrcaptaincook:

kinesin (a motor protein) pulling a some kind of vesicle along some kind of cytoskeletal filament

via John Liebler at Art of the Cell

(Reblogged from uaortho)

medicalschool:

Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

(Reblogged from medicalschool)
(Reblogged from medicalschool)

ri-science:

A demonstration of the VeinViewer - a device which allows you to see through the skin. The VeinViewer uses near-infrared light to detect vessels and blood up to 10mm beneath the surface, and projects a picture onto the skin to reveal vessel structure and blood flow in real time.

Clip taken from the 2013 Royal Institution CHRISTMAS LECTURES: Life Fantastic Lecture 1 - Where do I come from?

(Reblogged from uaortho)
sweetdeffect:

The Krukenberg procedure, also known as the Krukenberg operation, is a surgical technique that converts a forearm stump into a pincer. 

The procedure involves separating the ulna and radius for below-elbow amputations, and in cases of congenital absence of the hand, to provide a pincerlike grasp that is motored by the pronator teres muscle. The prerequisites for the operation are a stump over 10 cm long from the tip of the olecranon, no elbow contracture, and good psychological preparation and acceptance.

sweetdeffect:

The Krukenberg procedure, also known as the Krukenberg operation, is a surgical technique that converts a forearm stump into a pincer.

The procedure involves separating the ulna and radius for below-elbow amputations, and in cases of congenital absence of the hand, to provide a pincerlike grasp that is motored by the pronator teres muscle. The prerequisites for the operation are a stump over 10 cm long from the tip of the olecranon, no elbow contracture, and good psychological preparation and acceptance.

(Reblogged from uaortho)
For the first time, and to the astonishment of many of their colleagues, researchers created what they call Alzheimer’s in a Dish — a petri dish with human brain cells that develop the telltale structures of Alzheimer’s disease. In doing so, they resolved a longstanding problem of how to study Alzheimer’s and search for drugs to treat it; the best they had until now were mice that developed an imperfect form of the disease.
(Reblogged from medicalschool)

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

An Eritrean woman sits at transit camp in the Augusta port. She feels safe now that she is in Italy and is looking forward to a new life. She speaks four languages and is confident about the future. She tells the story of how she arrived in Italy:

“I came from Eritrea, through Sudan to Libya. I lived three months in Libya. There was a terrible war in Tripoli. There was no food or water available. The smugglers are the ones who beat you, take your money and take care of the trip (to Italy). My husband and I didn’t come together. He arrived first and I arrived the following day. When he saw me, he wanted to greet me, so he was beaten. We were separated and stayed in different houses. Me, I was not hurt. But they say for a woman alone, things happen in the desert: there are rape and abuse cases, girls are taken away, they get pregnant.

We spent three days in the desert. I saw three people buried. One had diabetes, he wanted a sip of water and food. They beat him and he died. They buried him in the desert and that was it. Death crossed my mind, yes. They beat you, they deprive you of food and water and they insult you. You cry day and night. You shed tears around the clock. You remember your homeland and when you call your parents, you lie; you say ‘I am fine’. You say ‘I eat and drink’, while you are sick and dying.”

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

(Reblogged from doctorswithoutborders)

medicalschool:

The seminiferous tubules (pseudocolored blue in the image to the left) are part of the male reproductive system and are the site of sperm production and development. The majority of the volume of the testis comprises tightly compacted seminiferous tubules, and the total collective length of these tubules in humans can range from 300 to 700 meters.

Image: Spermatids (pink) in seminiferous tubules of mouse testis. Digitally pseudocolored scanning electron microscopy.

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Ikram N’gadi

Syrians take pictures of their journey with the use of smartphone videos and cameras. The flow of people making the perilous crossing nearly doubled between June and August. According to UNHCR figures, more than 50% of refugee migrants are fleeing war and persecution, with Eritreans (29%) and Syrians (18%) the main nationalities recorded on arrival.

Go to https://www.doctorswithoutborders.org

(Reblogged from doctorswithoutborders)
astrodidact:

Amazing anatomical sand sculpture! via I fucking love science

astrodidact:

Amazing anatomical sand sculpture! via I fucking love science

(Reblogged from astrodidact)

medicalschool:

Vintage Illustration of the Human Heart

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

wetravelandblog:

Mont St Michel by paulyoudelis - Lets take a trip up to the sky http://ift.tt/15gf9xn

(Reblogged from satanstiger)

mediclopedia:

Vertebral Implant

3-D printing has been gaining more and more traction in the medical field. It’s versatility and precision allows for some amazing work to be done. 

Here is an example of a vertebral implant done in China. The idea is simple, but the execution was elegantly done. They used titanium that is already used safely for the main component of the vertebrae, and used a porous material that allows for fusion with the natural cell growth in the body.

This brings up an interesting point about the development and implementation of new technology… In foreign countries we are seeing the rise of these 3-D printed implants being used in the clinics, but because of the strict restrictions in the U.S. most 3-D printing technology is still being used for imaging and modeling purposes. Of course this allows for increase in safety and ensures optimal integration of the technology, but creates too much barriers (incl financial, accessibility) for patients…

I know we have readers pitching in from all over the world, what are your thoughts on regulations at your country? Do you feel like more regulations are needed, or maybe less?

(Reblogged from mediclopedia)

medicalschool:

Axial CT image with i.v. contrast. Macrocystic adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head.

(Reblogged from medicalschool)

infinity-imagined:

The Sun on October 16th, 2014.

(Reblogged from infinity-imagined)